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Notes on TCP/IP 
DHCP:

know that each subnet needs one scope, 
client reservation needs Ip-address and MAC-address
DHCP provides his clients via broadcast, which normally cannot pass a 
router. A router with DHCP relay agent lets them pass or you install 
a DHCP relay agent on a server in the subnet without DHCP server. He 
captures the broadcast queries and forwards them to the DHCP server. 
Therefore it needs of course the IP-address of the DHCP-server.
2 DHCP servers cannot replicate (WINS can!), therefore, for providing 
backups, you need to divert the range of IP-addresses to the 2 servers.
Exclude IP-addresses assigned to i.e. Unix servers from the IP-range.

SNMP:

a agent software is installed on a PC and sends informations to a 
management system. These 2 need to be on the same community. 
NT only offers agent software.
You can secure the agent by giving it the IP-address (or IPX or
NETBEUI name) and community name of only those servers which can ask the 
agent software. 
WINS:

WIns is needed if you want to browse your  network over routers.
Attention: Wins packets are directed  packets and therefore can 
pass routers. A Wins proxy agent is only needed, if you have 
not-wins-enabled clients in your network.

BROWSING:

Browsing is different from name resolution!!!!!
Browsing means that you can see the shares offered by servers on 
different subnets. This can be reached by WINS or by 
editing the LMHOSTS file. It must contain all PDCs of every subnet. 
BDCs recommended.
It is needed on every client to browse servers on other subnets and 
to log on if the PDC goes down. (to find the BDC).
Also the BDCs and PDCs need entries to find each other for 
replication.

DNS:

Know the cname and MX entries. cache.dns is used for connecting to 
the worldwide internet. 
A cacheonly server is used, when you have slow WAN-links, because 
zone transfer always transferres the whole database.
Know ABSOLUTELY the difference between Netbios name resolution and 
hostname resolution, and when is which used.
The mosts questions were on name resolution.
Know that even in Windows NT Explorer, when you want to connect to a 
server, who's name is longer than 15 chars (i.e. mycomp.alldata.com), 
NT switches automatically to DNS/hosts resolution, because WINS max 
namelength is 15 chars.
Know the syntax in LMHOSTS and HOSTS files and where they reside.
Know the utilities, but without switches.

TCP/IP commands and utilities

The following commands are provided for connecting to other TCP/IP-based hosts:

Connectivity Command Function
File Transfer Protocol (FTP) Provides bi-directional file transfers between a Windows NT computer and any TCP/IP host running FTP server software
Trivial File Transfer Protocol (TFTP) Provides bi-directional file transfers between a Windows NT computer and a TCP/IP host running TFTP server software
Telnet Provides terminal emulation on TCP/IP host running telnet server software
Remote Copy Protocol (RCP) Copies files between a Windows NT computer and a server running the RCP service
Remote Shell (RSH) Runs commands on a server running the RSH service
Remote Execution (REXEC) Runs a process on a remote computer
LPR Prints files to a host running the Lpdsvc service (server side of TCP/IP printing for UNIX clients)

Only FTP is provided as a server service; the rest only provide clients to access the services on other servers.

The following utilities are provided with Microsoft TCP/IP for troubleshooting TCP/IP problems:

Troubleshooting Utility Function
PING Verifies configurations and tests connectivity
FINGER Retrieves system information from a remote computer that supports the TCP/IP FINGER service
ARP Displays cache of locally resolved IP addresses to MAC (media access control) addresses
IPCONFIG Displays the current TCP/IP configuration
LPQ Obtains status of a print queue on a host running the LPD service
NBSTAT Displays a list of NetBIOS computer names that have been resolved to IP addresses
NETSTAT Displays the TCP/IP protocol session information
ROUTE Displays or modifies the local routing table
HOSTNAME Returns the local computers host name for authentication by the RCP, RSH, and REXEC utilites
TRACERT Displays the path a packet takes to a destination host

NetBIOS and Host name resolution

When using NetBIOS and TCP/IP host names to refer to computers, the corresponding IP address must be found. This is name resolution.

NetBIOS names resolution

The following methods are available (in order used) to Microsoft TCP/IP for resolving NetBIOS host names:

Method Description
NetBIOS Name Cache Local cache containing the locally registered computer names and computer names the local computer recently resolved.
NetBIOS Name Server A RFC 1001/1002 compliant computer to provide NetBIOS name resolution. Microsoft implements this as Windows Internet Names Server (WINS).
Local broadcast A b-node broadcast on the local network for the IP address of the destination.
LMHOSTS file Local file that maps IP addresses to NetBIOS computer names.
HOSTS file Local file in same format as a 4.3 BSD hosts file. Maps host names to IP addresses and is typically used to resolve names for TCP/IP utilities.
Domain Name Server (DNS) Server configured with DNS daemon that maintians database of IP address/host name mappings. Typical of UNIX environments.

Host name resolution

The following methods are available (in order used) to Microsoft TCP/IP for resolving host names:

Method Description
Local host name The host name of the computer. This is compared with the name of the destination host.
HOSTS file Local file in same format as a 4.3 BSD hosts file. Maps host names to IP addresses and is typically used to resolve names for TCP/IP utilities.
Domain Name Server (DNS) Server configured with DNS daemon that maintians database of IP address/host name mappings. Typical of UNIX environments.
WINS server A RFC 1001/1002 compliant computer to provide NetBIOS name resolution. Microsoft implements this as Windows Internet Names Server (WINS).
Local broadcast A b-node broadcast on the local network for the IP address of the destination.
LMHOSTS file Local file that maps IP addresses to NetBIOS computer names.